​​​​​​I'M MEXICAN AND PROUD OF MY HERITAGE

​My Story
 I am the Vicepresident and General Manager for Latin America of Toshiba America Information Systems. I started my story in Toshiba Mexico 18 years ago and I built from scratch the business for Latin America. I was asked to move to the United States to manage and grow the business from here. I am giving employment to people across all Latin America and I am generating yearly revenues for my company for $200million USD per year

  
Edgar Gonzalez  

My life history
Soy emigrante como munchos de nosotros madre soltera o divorciada tengo 3 hijos de quienes estoy muy orgullosa,igyal que munchos de nosotros, soy activista a nivel nacional,fundadora de "Strong women for democracy" como tamvien escritora,y retirada financial advisor, agradecida por las oportunidades brindadas por este pais hermano,pero nunca renegada de my origeb y raises latibo Americana o Mexico americana. O simplemente Mexicana,y recividora de reconocimientos opor otras culturas como la Africa americana, Rosa park fundation, reconocimiento a la tolerancia, LULAC, y por BEXAR COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY, Como tamvien la primer mujer Mexicana que escrivio un a declaraciones de agradecimiento y reconocimiento en el año 2005 al ya fallecido Martin luter king en contra de la descriminacion en la marcha mas grande del mundo iniciando asi la marcha mas grande en el mundo. Y lo hice en español siempre tras la lucha a favor de los Emigrantes y en contra de la descriminacion racial, actualmente despues de casi 20 años sigo siendo tamvien pricint char woman de my distrito. Que tiene mas de 8000 votantes haver ganado estas elecciones con un poco mas del %70 % de los votos, y muy orgullosamente "MEXICANA"!! Hasta la lucha, Si se puede!!


Regina Gomez

A Mexican Architect and Actor  
I moved to the New York City in 2001 to study acting, as it had always been my biggest dream. I joined the acclaimed Lee Strasberg Theater Institute and after a year and a half or so I got a practical training visa with which I was able to work in theater, some commercials and print work. I had a blast! After that ended I got a visa as an Architect (My first career in which I had worked for many years in Mexico City) and I joined a couple of firms in Manhattan doing High End Interior Architecture and Design always keeping acting classes on the side and doing as much theater as I possibly could. Since I received my Permanent Residency I am trying more and more the wonderful world of acting as well as continue my career in Architecture. All the fellow Mexican people I have met in this 14+ years in the United States are hard working, law abiding and caring good people and I want to believe that I have brought my own talents and good energy with me. The way I know this is true without being presumptuous is the AMAZING friendships that I have made and kept with so many amazing people here who are now part of my chosen family. I love this country, my mother is an American Citizen from Texas and I have always felt the US very close. It pains me to see so many people following false leaders that try to tarnish the image of a whole country just to gain power and control by spreading fear and lies. The US is a great country and Mexico is as well. We just need to not be afraid and look for SO MUCH we have in common instead of the things that separate us.   

Eric Robledo 

“Soy parte del Grupo de Expertos UNESCO de la Convención sobre la Protección y la Promoción de la Diversidad de las Expresiones Culturales (2005)”
Desde el 2011 formo parte de ese Grupo de Expertos que -a la fecha- se integra por 43 personas, provenientes de todas partes del mundo. De un total de 8 expertos provenientes de América Latina, somos tres los Mexicanos que hemos sido distinguidos como integrantes del mismo: Lucina Jiménez, Alfonso Castellanos y yo. La finalidad de este Grupo, con el apoyo de la UNESCO y de la Agencia Sueca de Cooperación Internacional, es la de fortalecer los derechos fundamentales, a través de la promoción de la diversidad de las expresiones culturales. Para lograr lo anterior, nuestra misión es la de construir capacidades y habilidades en los países en desarrollo, para la implementación de la Convención UNESCO 2005. http://en.unesco.org/creativity/capacity-building/experts/u/2910"

​   ​
Carlos Javier Villaseñor Anaya


My Story
I was born in the United States, but I had the opportunity to live in Durango, México for four years. I attended a Catholic Private school, and lived with my grandparents. This allowed me to learn about my heritage, my roots. When I moved back to the States, I faced a challenge of not comprehending the English language. In just a year, I was able to communicate with others in English. Now, I am a high school senior that will graduate in about three months. I have already been accepted to multiple colleges and I plan to further my education this fall. I am proud to be Mexican. I am an American Citizen, but I am also Mexican. I am both. I will not tolerate any hatred towards my race, nor anyone for that matter. I bleed the Aztec blood, I come from a country who has so much to offer to the world. I come from hard working people. Everywhere I go, I am always proud to represent my culture. 


​​Kamila Flores Barragán

Read some testimonials and life stories from Proud Mexicans.  ​ 

WE ARE ALL MIGRANTS

"I am mexican and right now with our NGO we have a social poster contest with the topic WE ARE ALL MIGRANTS because yes...we are!!!! http://www.escuchamivoz.org/index.php/en/concurso/brief WE want to join to this campaign "proud to be mexican" to support the same cause: The immigrants are in seeking opportunities and nations that receive them, if they have the ability to appreciate, grow along with them. Some nations have reached its glory and splendor thanks to immigrants. Whatever the circumstances of immigration, that which moves travelers to migrating is: the hoping to find something better, something different, other possible worlds and realities. Sharpen pencils and let's awaken creativity to express this broad spectrum of human migration, knowing that at the end we have all come somewhere, and at the end, we all have to emigrate"


Claudia Tello, Escucha mi voz.​   ​


 ​​It Is The Time For Bridges, Not For Walls  
CI just finished writing a book whose title is “The Comeback River”. It is about the American invasion of Mexico (1836-1848) and its ongoing consequences. We cannot go back in time, but neither can we continue the current status quo between us; we need to take a leap forward and set the groundwork to develop a continental integration beyond NAFTA, as the late Robert Pastor suggests in his book “The North American Idea”. We need to remove expansionism from the Monroe Doctrine and distrust form Bolivar’s ideals to join together through the bridges we need to build across The River. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ending the American war on Mexico was signed at my grandfather’s house (Morelos 10, Villa de Guadalupe) right in front of the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe; however, the treaty did not end the real war. The River has continued to carry innocent Mexican Blood in tis stream. This has to stop. Here is part of my story in “The Comeback River”: We need to promote the awareness about Mexico’s rights and the true history of the military conquest and annexation of our territories in the XIX Century, so Mexicans are no longer referred to and treated as “illegal aliens” or “wetbacks”, when according to the very words of Senator Corwin, it is the US presence in those lands that was born and imposed with clear injustice and illegality. Since after the Mexican-American war, there has been a profound human interaction between the peoples of the United States and Mexico. We have had sons and daughters together; We have dreamed, worked, lived and thrived together; We have pursued ideals, shared hardships, built cities, palaces and factories; We have sowed and harvested the land together. We have loved each other in spite of persecutions and prohibitions; We not only have mixed our blood but our souls. We have built a new race whose blood runs through the veins of our common sons and daughters; sons and daughters who go to the same schools; pray to the same God; play in the same parks; go to the same movies and have fallen in love to the tune of the same songs. We have laughed and shed tears together; We have rejoiced and mourned together; and we have gone to battle together against common enemies. Having as we have shed blood together in many rivers and oceans; in endless battlefields from the Boxer rebellion and World War I to World War II, on the beaches of Africa, Italy and France as well as on the many islands over the Pacific; in Korea, Viet Nam, Iraq, and Afghanistan, we have become much more than difficult neighbors; we have indeed become brothers and sisters. This is what we have to achieve: We need to awaken the consciences and shake prejudices to build a new coexistence where no one is deemed “illegal” and everyone is welcome in good faith. We need to change the way we live, and turn the bloodstained waters that have kept us apart, into The Comeback River. We are the children of Cuauhcetcui, the returning Eagle of our elders reaching out to the children of the dreamers who first touched American shores on the Mayflower.


Julio Chavez Montes

​​“I'm proud to be Mexican!

I'm proud to be Mexican! Naci y creci mexicana, se me impusieron los valores de la familia, de la solidaridad, del sentido de comunidad y muchos otros que me han acompañado a lo largo de mi carrera en la vida. La festividad, los colores y los sabores los traigo en la sangre y me siento Orgullosa de Ser Mexicana. Amo a los pueblos, las tradiciones envueltas en papel picado y flores rebozando de aromas y colores. !Soy Mexicana y a mucha honra! Mis oportunidades en mi México querido se agotaron, al igual que a muchos otros compatriotas; por lo que tuve que emigrar a este hermoso pais que me recibio con los brazos abiertos. Yo soy una profesional y mi trabajo actualmente es ayudar a los Refugiados que llegan a este país, y lo hago viendo en cada uno de ellos al ser humano que ha sufrido y necesita compasión y ayuda. Aunque ahora soy Mexico-Americana veo con mucho dolor, que los gobernantes mexicanos, siguen agachados ante los insultos de un americano sin principios, que quiere ser presidente de los Estado Unidos. Insultos que duelen y lastiman a miles de mexicanos que luchan por una vida digna y que se "rompen el lomo" trabajando hasta 16 horas diarias para cambiar las vidas de sus hijos y de sus familias y quienes no tienen una voz que los defienda (como siempre). Por primera vez voy a votar y por supuesto que lo haré en contra de ese señor del copete "tapa calva" que ademas de ridiculo es todo un nazi, KKK y agitador de masas. Gracias por esta oportunidad que se me da de expresarme."

MariaIsabel Acosta Martinez


​​Talented Artisan Women
This message comes from our almost 200 artisan women that creates purses, shoeware, clothes and other accesories with their own hands by broidery. They are bilingual since they speak spanish and their own native language. By tradition they learn how to weave and with the years they to perfectionate their technique. Today, this women apply all their creativity to deliver high quality designs. They belong to a region in the southeastern of Mexico, where the jobs are few since then the majority prefers to leave. Bazarte provides the opportunity for them to stay in their homeland while teach them quality concepts and team work. Today we all are trying to bring jobs to more women by positioning their products in Mexico and US. We help them creating the online store so they can reach more people. What this women are doing is amazing and must be taken into consideration for new tendency in fashion. Please visit www.bazarte.com.mx and take a look at this article about them: http://mexicoacolores.com/2016/01/25/bazarte-san-cristobal-y-el-rescate-del-arte-textil-chiapaneco/


Chiapas Artisan Women

Finding Success and Helping People Find their Purpose

"I was born in Mexico City in 1972. I was raised in a typical middle-class family in the northern suburbs. I attended private schools through high school and attended college and graduated with honors from the Escuela Normal de Especializacion with a degree in Special Education for Learning Disabilities. I started my career in education as a special education teacher and then as a trainer for education professionals. Ten years after graduation I married an American man and emigrated to the United States. I had no connections, no network and no big credentials. Through preparation and determination, I landed my first corporate job with one of the top 100 learning outsourcing companies in the US, starting my career in corporate training and instructional design. I have built a successful career path based on helping organizations align their business goals with their learning strategies. My husband and I have a strong marriage and are very proud of our two children, ages 5 and 7 who are being raised with the best of both worlds. We have integrated our cultures and backgrounds and intentionally created a culture of our own with the best values from our two countries. I obtained naturalization in 2015. In addition to my consulting job, I am currently working on building a professional practice as a facilitator of a process called LifePlan(TM), which helps people identify their gifts and talents and build a life of purpose. I am very proud of my heritage and the experiences I had growing up in Mexico that have shaped who I am today.” ​

Lily Kreitinger


Quiero compartir mi historia de entrega a este país desde que emigre de ese gran país México.
Alejandro Martínez y soy bendecido, y tengo el honor de decir que soy mexicano, nací en la ciudad de mexica en 1965 y a la edad de 18 emigre a Estados Unidos, cruzar su frontera exponiendo a mis amadas hijas (bebitas en ese tiempo) junto a mi esposa, y mi vida, nunca se puede olvidar... después de trabajar pizcando fresas por 5 temporadas en california, me dedique a trabajar en lo que sabia, reparar vehículos, comenzaron mis estudios y después de terminar 9 años de institutos teológicos y 6 años de estudios bíblicos se me concedió la oportunidad de viajar a muchos países , llevando una ayuda a extranjeros en necesidad.. El Salvador, Guatemala, Canadá, Turquía, Israel, México ( muchos viajes que desconozco la cantidad ) y aun continuar ayudando tanta gente americana que sufre el desfortunio de carecer de los servicios básicos aquí en usa, si miles de homeless, a los que se les ayuda sin pedirles nada a cambio, solo por la gratitud de ser adoptado en este país y dedicar a mi familia al beneplácito deseo de servir después tener un papel legal de usa. Mis metas cada día crecen, ayudar a esos americanos homeless sin hogar, no me hace olvidar que en México siempre tendré una casa y una familia paterna y materna que me esperan, por eso estos orgulloso de ser mexicano y servir a la gente de cualquier país, como hermano mexicano... mis hijas y nietos hoy dedican su tiempo a sus trabajos y estudios y quieren a México mucho, porque ven en sus abuelos un pedacito de patria....” ​

Alejandro Martínez Corro


Fed Central Banker and Proud Mexican!

 
Greetings, My name is Cindy Morand and I was a central banker at the U.S. central bank for almost 5 years. I have been published at CNBC and the Huffingtonpost, as well as in a book called Red the Book published by the Hudson Press. Most importantly, I am a proud Mexican! I've noticed the Donald Trump remarks have given a bad image to Mexicans, which is extremely unfortunate especially to those who do not know our culture. A little about me, I was born in New York to a Mexican mother and French father, but I grew up in Sahuayo Michoacan (age 3-13), my foundational years. So after 13, I moved back to New York, having learned strong Mexican values such as hard work. Funny enough, I didn't speak english well, but I taught myself and in my classes with american students, I was better than them at math, chemistry and I had taken geography (something americans take in college at best). So this is to show, I learned more in Mexico and had a better education than my peers, and I also learned the importance of hard work. One of my teachers in Mexico used to say "What will you contribute to the world? How will your work have an impact on society" and that is a message I carry with me for over 14 years. During my time in New York, I admired all of the Mexicans that had underpaid service jobs, those who came alone and worked, and I always felt spoiled for even complaining about having to study long hours or take another extra curricular activity. Fast forward a few years later, I graduated on top of my class at university and got a job offer at the U.S. central bank, the Fed. During my time at the Fed I managed to get promoted every single year, sometimes twice, 5 promotions in 3 years was one of my best accomplishments. One must wonder how, why, and I say because in Mexico I learned the importance of hard work. In conclusion, yes, let's use some stereotypes here, Mexicans love to work hard! Now that is a stereotype I love to embrace and a good one I think. Mexicans like to work. Mexicans will get things done. Mexicans help the economy. Can we say that about all Americans? Can we say that to those that are taking advantage of welfare or feel too good to do a service job? I don't think so. In the end, Mexicans are hard working and in order for an economy to be successful then I guess you need us. They say ignorance is bliss, but Donald Trump and his remarks are false and the vulgarity in his speech is a true embarrassment to the United States. Us proud Mexicans cannot afford to let a poorly informed and narrow minded Hitler like individual destroy the image of hardworking people that deserve respect and appreciation for all of their efforts, despite the fact that they are underpaid.

         
Cindy Morand

“My Success Story"

I'm originally from Mexico. Before meeting my husband, I was a successful entrepreneur in the city of Tepeji, Hidalgo. I worked for several Fortune 500 companies, both in the area and outside the country as a Spanish<>English Technical Translator. After marrying my husband, I moved to Up State New York in 2004, leaving all my business behind. In 2008 I became a NY State court interpreter. I enroll in college to learn about the US Criminal Justice system. I graduated in 2014 as a Bachelor in Criminal Justice summa cum laude. In October 2015 I became the only Federally Certified Court Interpreter for the Northern District of New York. I'm proud to be Mexican and to let anybody know about my origin!"

Susana Carman, NY 


​​Im proud to be a MEXICAN WOMAN
hola mis adorados compatriotas, soy Artista Plástico viviendo en Monterrey, México, estoy orgullosa de ustedes y de la labor que están haciendo .. desafortunadamente al parecer el Sr. Trum se vale de noticia racista y chismes en contra de mexicanos.. y como la discriminación esta desatada en ese país , al parecer sus palabras en contra de los mexicanos le ha valido para subir peldaños, espero no estén ustedes haciendo más ruido y más noticia .. eso le da más importancia a alguien que no la merece... Esperemos que no llegue a su meta final .. porque siento que atraerá mucho problema tanto al país vecino como al nuestro.. saludos y mis mejores deseos..

P.D. Les comparto mi pagina http://arteabstractomlucero.blogspot.mx/ http://artecubomlucero.blogspot.mx/ https://www.facebook.com/ArtistaPlastico.MonicaLucero/ https://twitter.com/MLuceroArte


Mónica Lucero


​​Don & Doña Ro’: Legacy of a Mexican couple.
As fate would have it, my father as a single man had to travel to the north-west Mexico border, to assist corporations during a turbulent economic time, prior to the Second World War. In doing so, he detected a serious need for economic development for this US/México region. He considers staying in the area to help strengthen this part of the Mexican ‘Wild, Wild West’; especially when my mother accepts his long-distance marriage proposal. Thus, these two highly-successful professionals end up settling-down on this (non-existent) México-California border, after they wed in San Diego in 1938 and finally move their growing family here, in the early 1940’s. All this at a time when these border communities literally co-existed in complete symbiotic harmony… Mexican people assisting Americans and vice versa - back and forth across the border ‘line’ on a daily basis - for mutual benefit of their economic progress and personal security. Surely back then, NO one would’ve dared suggest building ‘impenetrable walls’ between them - they needed each other’s knowledge, capabilities, determination and moral support. During those first few years of World War II, even with his ever-growing young family, my father hears the call of duty and tries to enlist in the U S Army. After completely reviewing his background, his professional track record and his early military education and multilingual expertise - particularly, his fluency in German -, the Army representative suggest that, instead of carrying a rifle somewhere in Europe, he remain in this area in his civilian job to help assist the war effort, in what became an unexpected role: - By that time, as the general manager of several businesses along the shores of Baja California, he gives top priority to selling the entire fishing seasons’ catch of key canned: albacore, tuna, sardines, anchovies and abalone to the US Department of Defense. Thus, feeding thousands of US troops, high-protein, high-omega oils and non-perishable food for years, until VJ day. - Also, in running the most powerful (50KW) radio station throughout the Pacific region, he ended up protecting the mainland’s western coast in an incredible way: With his knowledge of German and Morse Code, he uncovers a spy-ring headed by a Hollywood celebrity. The spy had been disguising information about US maritime and military operations along the western shores, as unassuming musical programing; beaming the powerful ‘Mighty 6-90’ signal, hundreds of miles east into the mainland and then, directly to the Nazi-Germany high command. My father immediately reported this discovery to the OSS in San Diego, who quickly detained the unsuspecting celebrity spy. That is how a Mexican father of twelve, became an unsung World War II hero, contributing as well, to the United States’ victories against the countries comprising the ‘Axis of Evil’. Both parents played significant roles in kicking-off the unstoppable success of a thriving North-West México and most of California’s main ports, up to and including, the Napa Valley region. Thanks to this three-quarter century, unselfish cross-border cooperation, these are now one of the most vibrant & dynamic economic regions for both neighboring countries. Through our parent’s exemplary hard work and an indomitable spirit, they conveyed their values to their twelve children by living a life of continuous service to their fellow man. Nowadays with the same drive and dedication, each of those twelve highly-accomplished professionals, as well as their spouses and offspring (many of whom, through our parents’ example, have earned Master’s & Doctoral degrees in several countries) in turn, honor their forebearers’ legacy of benefitting, NOT the ‘bottom line’ per-sé; but instead… Mankind! … It’s a wonder, just how an ‘Impenetrable - ‘Drumpf’ - Wall’ between México and the United States in the 1940’s, would’ve changed the positive cross-border impact of this proud Mexican (inclusive) family. Respectfully, One of the twelve children of ‘The Ro’s’. P. S. - For more information about the dozens of areas impacted by this Mexican family on US/México Relations & Development, a future post may be added.


Cris Torres

I´m proud to be Mexican

"Soy mexicano, estudie en México mi licenciatura y recibí una beca para estudiar mi doctorado en Ingeniería Química en Princeton University, trabaje en Alemania con el Dr. G. Ertl (Beca Humboldt) Premio Nobel de Química 2007, soy orgullosamente profesor universitario en México. Mi país, mi gente, mis tradiciones, mi cultura, son mi principal fuerza contra la ignorancia y la xenofobia de gentes como el Sr. Trump. Soy orgullosamente Mexicano."

Ramiro Rico Martínez

​I'm proud mexican

"We came to USA more than 20 years ago. My husband, my little baby of 1 year and me.  We came to work hard to do a new future as we got a bit debt and lost my husband job. We worked in many places as busboy, as waiter and me taking care babies, and cleaning houses. We got just enough to pay rent and for food. We live with our heart broken for leaving our country but also cause our baby has autism. After 4 years we got a new baby so we work harder and send both kids to school and taking care of both.  Our autism kid can’t apply for the services he need as he did not born on USA, and till now he don’t have the proper care and medications and I can’t work as before cause I’m full time taking care him after he graduated from high school and now he is home all time. But as good Mexicans we keep strong and keep our heads up and we want stay here in USA giving our life for our family and be good people. Thank you for reading me.” ​

Maria Isidro

​​DREAMER

I am a 22 years old with a 3 year old son. I am employed here in the U.S and have been trying to finish my college education. I want to major in Mechanical Engineering & set an example to be the first of my family to have a college degree. I am proud of my heritage because I want my son to know where he is from and not want any person who is racist and have a closed mind. They are wrong and no one can tell me or my son that Mexicans are horrid people. I will not stand by and see how others judge while they have no clue how to be a good hard working person. We can shut them up by proving them wrong. I know because I am doing so. Thank you."​

Maricruz Favela

"Diseñador Mexicano en NYC"

Soy un dreamer nací en México pero no fue fácil mudarse a un nuevo país con nuevo idioma eso fue difícil pero que estoy luchando por mi sueño soy diseñador y vivo en NYC trabajo con Miss New York presentadoras de Univision y más artistas como Jaci Velásquez . And Im pround to be Mexican".​   ​


Ferret Campos, Diseñador Mexicano,  New York City 

Terminal Binacional CBX
Tuve la oportunidad de representar a los inversionistas Mexicanos y ser Project Manager de la Terminal Binacional CBX entre Tijuana y San Diego. Trabajé codo a codo con muchos Norte Americanos involucrados en el proyecto; congresistas, alcaldes, representantes de agencias de seguridad, empresarios, etc. siempre de forma amigable, cordial y eficiente. Donald Trumpo se muestra, sin lugar a dudas, como alguien aislado respecto a la visión de su vecino país. Hoy la CBX es una realidad operando desde diciembre del 2015, y se logró gracias a una visión conjunta de Fronteras Seguras entre Estados Unidos y México.


Javier Lachica Bravo.


 
​​Proud to be Mexican  
Cesar Vergara recipient of Railway Age Graham Claytor Award Written by William C. Vantuono, Editor-in-Chief Railway Age has selected noted railway industry industrial designer Cesar A. Vergara as recipient of the 2015 W. Graham Claytor Jr. Award for Distinguished Service to Passenger Transportation. Vergara will accept the award at the 22nd Annual Passenger Trains on Freight Railroads Conference in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 28, 2015. The Graham Claytor Award, determined by Railway Age’s editors and publisher, is presented annually and is based largely on a lifetime of achievement for an individual who has contributed significantly to the advancement of passenger rail in America. Vergara, President and Chief Designer of Vergarastudio, “is internationally recognized in passenger transportation design, with three decades of experience managing and leading design teams in consulting firms and transit agencies in Europe, North America and Latin America,” said Railway Age Editor-in-Chief William C. Vantuono. “He is the Raymond Loewy and Henry Dreyfuss of his generation.” Vergara, who recently accepted the position of Principal Industrial Designer with SNC-Lavalin Group subsidiary Interfleet, formed Vergarastudio in 2009. Prior to that, he held industrial design positions with various organizations. He was National Principal of Design at Jacobs Civil from 2003 to 2009; Chief Designer and Assistant Executive Director at New Jersey Transit from 2001 to 2003; Senior Director of Rail at Teague from 1999 to 2001; Director of Vehicle Design and Manager of Car Design at Amtrak from 1990 to 1999; Chief Designer of National Railways of Mexico (N de M) from 1987 to 1990; Senior Industrial Designer at Henry Dreyfuss Associates from 1986 to1987; and an industrial designer at Gustavsberg Villeroy Bosch and Utveckings Design, Stockholm, Sweden, from 1980 to 1982. MBTA 2001 first revenue round trip at ReadingAmong Vergara’s numerous designs are the Wabtec/MotivePower HSP46 diesel-electric locomotive for MBTA (pictured); the Siemens DMU for SMART (Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit), California; the Kawasaki M8 EMU commuter train for Metro-North and Connecticut DOT; the Brookville BL36PH diesel-electric locomotive for SFRTA (South Florida Regional Transportation Authority); the Alstom PL42 diesel-electric locomotive for NJ Transit; the General Electric AMD 103 diesel-electric Genesis locomotive for Amtrak, and the Cascades Talgo trainset for Amtrak and the Washington State DOT. He is the recipient of several Brunel Awards and a Cooper Hewitt Triennial Award. Since 1991, he has been an active member of the Watford Group of railway architects and designers. Vergara also participates in APTA and COMTO (Conference Of Minority Transportation Officials). Vergara, who hails from Mexico City and came to the United States in 1970 when his father, a World Bank executive, accepted a U.S. post, holds master’s and bachelor’s degrees in Fine Arts in Industrial Design from Konstfack University College of Art and Design, Stockholm, Sweden. He resides in Ridgefield, Conn., and has five children with his wife, Aideen, a nurse practitioner. Railway Age established the W. Graham Claytor Jr. Award for Distinguished Service to Passenger Transportation in 1994 in honor of the now-legendary Amtrak and Southern Railway president and U.S. Secretary of the Navy. It is presented annually at the Passenger Trains on Freight Railroads conference.


Cesar A. Vergara